These Video Doorbells Have Terrible Security

Researchers at Consumer Reports found vulnerabilities in popular video doorbells on major online retail sites including Amazon, Walmart and Temu, according to a new report. Hackers could use a companion app to take over the devices and view camera footage, the report found.

The doorbells were sold under a variety of brand names, mainly Eken and Tuck, on Amazon, Walmart, Sears, Shein and Temu. All the doorbells paired with the app Aiwit and were manufactured by the Chinese company Eken Group Ltd., Consumer Reports said. Some doorbells were also missing a registration code required by the Federal Communications Commission.

"Products like these, by failing to prioritize trust and safety, put domestic violence victims at risk. Without question, the one place a victim needs to be safe is in their home,” Adam Dodge, CEO of EndTAB, a nonprofit that provides information on how to combat technology-enabled abuse, told Consumer Reports. “Devices designed to make someone feel safe at home, while actually doing the opposite, shouldn’t be allowed on the market."

If you bought a vulnerable doorbell from one of these marketplaces, consider switching to a larger, better-vetted brand such as Ring or Nest.

Vulnerable doorbells from Eken Group were sold under many brand names, including the following:

Eken
Tuck
Fishbot
Rakeblue
Andoe
Gemee
Luckwolf

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